Interesting Photos From Outer Space

Image Credits: Getty Images/NASA

Image Credits: Getty Images/NASA

We have always wondered what goes beyond the cloud above us - and for centuries, we have been trying to break that barrier, to go above and beyond. In 1961, Yuri Gagarin, a Soviet cosmonaut, finally made it through the atmosphere and became the first man to journey into outer space. Since then, tremendous progress has been made in space exploration, and we are able to see things we never imagined we would. Wonder what Major Tom sees? Here we go

Egypt From Space

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

It’s always interesting to see something we are familiar with from a different angle - while we might be picturing pyramids and hustling bazaars in Egypt, it looks nothing like that from outer space. In the grand scheme of things, what we know and believe is limited, and perhaps meaningless, and seeing things from outer space put that into perspective, literally. Pictured here are the River Nile, the Red Sea, and the Sinai Peninsula, from NASA's STS-83 mission.

Strait Of Gibraltar

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Now, moving westward for a bit, we get to the Strait of Gibraltar - the strait that separates Europe and Africa. To the left that’s Africa (Morocco), and to the right that’s Europe (Spain/ British Gibraltar). The closest gap between the two continents is a mere 8 miles. If you have a chance to go to Gibraltar, you should - on a clear day, you can see Africa across the strait at Europa Point.

Storm Over Africa

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

I bless the rains down in Africa… but probably not a storm. We have experienced storms on the ground - but ever wondered what it looks like up there? Pictured here is a 30-mile-wide stormcloud over the coast of Nigeria, from the space shuttle Columbia during NASA's STS-55 mission, 2nd May 1993. If you would like to go to Africa one day... Hurry boy, it's waiting there for you.

Bush Fires

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

It is also possible to see things that are happening on the ground in outer space - pictured here are the bush fires in southern Mozambique, Africa. As we can see, the fires were scattered all over, as you can see from the smoke coming up from here and there. This photo was taken from the space shuttle Discovery, during NASA's STS-70 mission, July 1995.

Lake Baikal

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Located in Siberia, Lake Baikal is the largest and deepest lake in the world - how big? The lake itself is bigger than Taiwan, for example. So it wouldn’t be a surprise to be able to see it from space - pictured here is the northern end of Lake Baikal in southern Siberia, as seen from the space shuttle Discovery during NASA's STS-60 mission, February 1994. If you have a chance, try going to a town called Severobaikalsk, located at the northern tip of the lake.

Mount Everest

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

To really put things into perspective - here is a picture of Mount Everest, the highest peak in the world. For years, mountaineers and adventurists alike have tried to conquer the peak, often meeting their untimely fate. A lot of people see the conquering of the peak as the ultimate goal, the triumph of men over nature, the pinnacle of true realization. However, does it really matter after all, in the grand scheme of things?

The International Space Station

Image Credits: Getty Images/NASA

Image Credits: Getty Images/NASA

The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest single structure humans ever put into space - the size is even bigger than a football field! Throughout its history, representatives from 19 countries have visited the station. It is an international project, and politics do not play a role there...most of the time - since the Russian Soyuz is the only method to board the ISS at the moment, cosmonauts from all over the world go to Kazakhstan to get onboard the Russian Soyuz rocket to reach the ISS.

The Bright Side Of The Moon

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” a famous quote by Neil Armstrong, the first man to leave a footstep on the moon in 1969. While the moon seems to be far from our reach, after years of scientific research, we did make it there after all. Pictured here is the horizon of the moon, something that Armstrong saw when he was miles away from the Earth. You can also see the craters on the moon in this photo. 

Sunrise In Space

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers

What is good about being alive? Sunrises, and sunsets. For me, to be able to see the sunrise is enough to be thankful for being alive. I remember the bus rides I’ve had, across the endless fields, where the land meets the sky and blend into one - then the sun came, parting the sky and the lonesome earth. It was mesmerizing...but seeing it in outer space? I can only fathom.

The Tibetan Plateau

Image Credits: Getty Images/Heritage Space/Heritage Images

Image Credits: Getty Images/Heritage Space/Heritage Images

Tibet is one of the top dream destinations for travelers - the air (or the lack thereof), the lakes, the blue sky, the people...it always has a mysterious veil to it, and it comes with dreamy wonders. While it is impressive to get on top of the mountains and overlook the world below your foot, it might be arguably more so if you view it from high above - like this picture, that was taken during the first Space Shuttle flight in 1981.

Now It's Time To Leave The Capsule If You Dare

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers/NASA

Image Credits: Getty Images/Space Frontiers/NASA

Okay, this is not really Major Tom - but astronaut Bruce McCandless II, pictured during the first untethered EVA, made possible by his nitrogen jet-propelled backpack. While doing his famous spacewalk, he decided to ease up the tension by referencing Neil Armstrong, he said 'It may have been a small step for Neil, but it’s a heck of a big leap for me.'

Apollo 9 Lunar Module

Image Credits: Getty Images/Rolls Press/Popperfoto

Image Credits: Getty Images/Rolls Press/Popperfoto

Launched from Kennedy Space center on March 3, 1969, Apollo 9’s paved way for space exploration for years to come - including the moon landing that happened the same year. The technology was cutting-edge at the moment, and pictured here is the Apollo 9 lunar module, as it separates from the command/service module, beginning a rendezvous maneuver during the ten-day orbital testing mission, as part of the Apollo space program.

Life On Mars? 

Image Credits: Getty Images/Heritage Space/Heritage Images

Image Credits: Getty Images/Heritage Space/Heritage Images

You might have seen photos of Mars - rocky, gritty...red and hot, devoid of life forms. But here is another one for you - in the 1970s, NASA's Viking program consisted of a pair of American space probes sent to Mars, Viking 1 and Viking 2, and the picture was taken after it got to the surface. There’s still a lot of things we don’t know about Mars - however, Elon Musk seems to have a plan for Mars colonization. We will see how that goes.

The USA From Space

Image Credits: Flickr

Image Credits: Flickr

Ever wondered what the USA looks like from outer space? Here you go. When Apollo 9 was on its mission orbiting around the earth, it also took a lot of photos of us (or likely your parents/ grandparents), and the places. Take a look at how tiny those states are from the space, right? 

Here they are. All these images show us a different perspective of our world and let us see the true nature of the place we live in. Which one do you like the most? Would you like to go to space one day? If you enjoyed these photos from outer space, why not share it with your friends?

Source: NASA, Life Science