Rare Photos From The Past

We all learn about history in very different ways, but one of the main ones is through school or movies. Despite this, it is not strange to find images that, in some way, show us a very different side of the story we know. Those images allow us to see the characters and events in another way because history is full of moments that were never fully explained. For example, did you know that Adolf Hitler was the best man in Joseph Goebbels wedding?

Not all of it is reflected in the books, so a little research can lead us to find images of historical moments that we had never seen. The following collection of photos presents some of the most iconic moments in history from a more natural and conventional perspective than we are used to seeing while learning about it.

30. The Schienenzeppelin

This "Zeppelin railway" was an experimental railway car that closely resembled the design of zeppelin airships, and was designed and developed by the German aeronautical engineer Franz Kruckenberg in 1929. Its propulsion was mainly given by a large metallic propeller that was located in the back of the car. This propulsion system allowed it to reach 230.2 km / h, thus obtaining the speed record on the ground for a vehicle on rails powered by gasoline.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

Sadly, only one copy of this vehicle was built and never came into operation for safety reasons. The railway was dismantled in 1939 because its materials were necessary for the German army. It was made at the beginning of the 1930s as part of
the Hannover-Leinhausen works of the German Imperial Railway Company, measuring 25.85 meters long and only carrying 40 passengers.

29. "Fat Man"

This was the code name for the type of atomic bomb that was detonated in Nagasaki by the United States on August 1945. It was the second of the only nuclear weapons used in war. The first was "Little Boy," and its explosion was the third made by man in the history of humanity. This bomb was developed at the Los Alamos Laboratory using a plutonium matrix from the Hanford site and was launched from a Boeing B-29 Superfortress Bockscar.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

Its name comes from its design, for having a broader and rounder part than the rest of its construction. It was an implosion-type bomb that had a solid core of radioactive material, which gave it its power. Before its launch, other weapons of this type were detonated in the Trinity and Operation Crossroads nuclear tests. Approximately 120 "Fat Man" units were produced before 1949 when the Mark 4 bomb replaced this model.

28. "Boggins Window-Crib"

The person responsible for this strange invention was the author Louis Fischer, who in his book "The Health-Care of the Baby," spoke for the first time about this weird way of helping the health of babies. Initially, it was listed as a "convenient outdoor sleeping compartment, easily connected to any window" that could be adapted to any building in the city. Thirty-six inches long by twenty-four inches wide and twenty-seven inches tall, it was comfortable enough for the baby and allowed the mothers to keep them always in sight.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

The first patent of this product was obtained by Emma Read of Spokane, Washington, in 1922. She said that the purpose of her invention was to provide an article for infants and young children, suspended on the outside of an adjacent building, where you could place a baby or a small child. Mothers from the USA and London adopted it as a way to offer their kids fresh air.

27. The original model of Mount Rushmore

The initial idea of ​​this project belongs to the historian Doane Robinson, who proposed the idea as a way to promote tourism in South Dakota. Robinson managed to convince the sculptor Gutzon Borglum in 1924 of this idea. Gutzon traveled to the Black Hills region to examine the place and ensure that the project was viable. The sculpture would initially be made on granite pillars known as "The Needles," but Borglum rejected the idea because they were too thin to sculpt them.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

He chose Rushmore for the quality of its rock and its constant exposition to the sun from the southeast. Between 1927 and October 31, 1941, the sculptor and 400 workers dedicated themselves to carving the colossal 18 meters high busts that would represent the four most outstanding presidents of the country. George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Theodore Roosevelt, and Abraham Lincoln. The plaster models and tools remain as part of the tourist attraction of the place.

26. The “Great Manta” of Captain A.L. Kahn

Although the story is true and A.L. Kahn captured this stingray at some point in his history as a sailor, the image is not quite real. There is evidence that this animal exists and has been captured on previous occasions by other sailors, but its appearance is very different from what we see in the image. The reason it was discovered that the picture shows a dissected animal is that several seam marks can be seen on the skin.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

It's reasonable that the animal was dissected because he subsequently placed it as part of the sample of a circus that toured the country for many years.
The "Great Manta" toured the entire United States during 1934 and 35 as a side act among "World's Fair Freaks." You can find the real images of the capture of the animal, where it is shown more floppy and with a much more realistic appearance to that of this image.

25. The Ford Model T

Henry Ford's T model was known as "the universal car" because of its costs and the ease of learning to drive it. It was introduced to the market in October 1908, and all the other auto companies quickly copied its left-hand-drive. The engine and transmission, along with its four cylinders, were enclosed in a single block that significantly reduced its weight.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

It was so economical and easy to use that, by the 1920s, almost all American drivers had learned to handle them, and most of them had one. Ford had the idea of ​​creating a massive advertising campaign behind this model to make sure that all the newspapers announced it. The success of this vehicle was such that the gains were of 100% compared to the previous year. The inclusion of the assembly line in their plants reduced the costs and increased efficiency, allowing them to improve their production.

24. Auto Polo in 1910

This strange sport about cars was invented in the United States with rules very similar to the equestrian pole, but using automobiles instead of horses. It was a popular sport in fairs and sports centers in the country, and in some parts of Europe from 1911 to 1920. But despite its popularity, it was a hazardous sport that had a high risk of injury and death for participants and spectators.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

Part of the credit for his invention is attributed to Joshua Crane, Jr. of the Dedham Polo Club in Boston. After demonstrating his driving skills and using a polo stick at the same time, he showed the viability of the sport to the general public. Its official inventor was Ralph "Pappy" Hankinson, a Topeka Ford car dealer. He used it as a strategy for the Model T. No other vehicle had the characteristics to perform the necessary maneuvers in this strange sport.

23. The Buran, the first "space plane."

The first spacecraft produced by the Soviet/Russian program Buran bore the same name, meaning "snowstorm" or "blizzard." This ship was also known by other names such as "OK-1K1," "Orbiter K1," "OK 1.01," or "Shuttle 1.01." This spacecraft completed its first crewless flight in 1988, but it was destroyed in 2002 because the hangar where it was collapsed. To date, it is the only reusable Soviet shuttle launched into space.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

The project of the Soviet/Russian space plane and its orbiter that carried that name began the construction of aircraft in 1980, launching the first one in 1984. The development of the second version of the Buran, the OK-1k2, started in 1988, but the Buran program was closed in 1993, and this aircraft was never completed. The Buran class orbiter used a class of super heavy-duty launch vehicle called Energy.

22. The "Graf Zeppelin" flying over Washington, DC.

It was a rigid hydrogen-filled aircraft, built and operated by Germans from 1928 to 1927. It became the first commercial transatlantic travel service in the world and was recognized as a marvel of engineering at that time. It was built by the Zeppelin Company (Luftschiffbau Zeppelin) in Friedrichshafen am Bodensee, Germany, between 1926 and 1928, and was based on the model of the LZ-126, which was delivered to the United States in 1924.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

His name is a tribute to the pioneer of German aircraft Ferdinand von Zeppelin, who was also known for holding the title of count (Graf) in the nobility of his country. This ship made 590 flights and covered more than 1.7 million kilometers during the time it was operational. It was the longest rigid aircraft at the time of its construction and was only surpassed by the USS Akron in 1931. In 1940, the ship was scrapped to use its parts in the building of combat aircraft.

21. Propeller blades of the Titanic

The RMS Titanic was a famous British ocean liner that was known as the largest ship in the world by the end of its construction in 1912. It sunk during its maiden voyage, from Southampton to New York, on April 15 of that year after colliding against an iceberg. During this tragedy, 1514 people died, and it's considered one of the most significant shipwrecks in world history. The Titanic was the 2nd of the three Olympic-class ocean liners that belonged to White Star.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

In February 1912 the large bronze propellers that provided the propulsion of the ship were added to it. The lateral ones had three blades each, they measured more than seven meters in diameter, and weighed 38 tons. The central propeller was the smallest of them because it measured just 5 meters in diameter and weighed only 22 tons. A curious fact about it is that it was the only one that could not work in reverse.

20. The Golden Gate Bridge

This suspension bridge extends over the 1.6-kilometer stretch that connects the San Francisco Bay with the Pacific Ocean. This fantastic structure connects the city of San Francisco with Marin County, giving it access to US Route 101 and California State Route 1. It's one of the Wonders of the Modern World and, over the years, has become a recognized symbol worldwide of the city, the state, and the country.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

This idea was not new at that time, but it was an article written by the former engineering student James Wilkins that consolidated the project. Wilkins' initial calculations were around $ 100 million (approximately $ 2.3 billion today), so he had to ask the opinions of experts in the field. Joseph Strauss responded, and based on his initial drawings of the idea; he promised that it could be built for much less.

19. The first slide of Great Britain

According to the images found by some historians, the inventor of the slide was Charles Wicksteed, who initially built it for his park, but ended up selling it all over the world. The first one was built in 1922 at Wicksteed Park in Kettering, Northamptonshire, the first park of its kind in the United Kingdom. The original materials of this invention were polished wooden boards, and because it was something new for the time, it became viral among children.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

In its early days, there was a slide for girls and a slide for boys, but this distinction was eliminated over time, and it became universal. In addition to the slide, he invented other children's games that he also adapted to his park for children's entertainment. The other devices, such as the maypole and the swing plank, also attracted a lot of attention from people, so his park was top-rated.

18. The remains of Vladimir Komarov

Vladimir Mikhaylovich Komarov was a Soviet test pilot, spacial engineer, and cosmonaut who became the first to go to space twice. He commanded the Voskhod 1 in 1964 on the first space flight that carried more than one crew member, and solo flew the Soyuz 1 on its first human-crewed test flight. He died due to a series of failures of the Soyuz capsule that caused him to crash into the ground after re-entering the planet on April 24, 1967.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

Komarov was one of the most experienced and prepared candidates who was accepted in the first cosmonaut squad in 1960. Although he was declared unfit for training on two occasions, his perseverance and advanced engineering skills allowed him to stay on the program. He contributed to the design of several vehicles, the preparation of other astronauts and the development of the program. His death made him the first human to die during a space mission, so he is remembered in the history of space travel around the world.

17. Jimi Hendrix at the wheel of a buggy

James Marshall Hendrix was a famous American rock guitarist, singer, and songwriter who revolutionized the musical world in the four years of his leading career. He is recognized worldwide as one of the most influential guitarists in history and is one of the most famous musicians of the 20th century. He appears registered in "The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame" as one of the best instrumentalists in the history of rock music.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

It's a strange image because Hendrix did not even have a driver's license, but he owned several vehicles, including a Corvette Stingray. This photograph was captured on October 1968, in Honolulu, Hawaii, and shows Hendrix driving a dune buggy with an unidentified woman. It was not the first time he was seen driving, but at least at that time, he did not crash the vehicle.

16. Diving suits of the early twentieth century

Leonardo da Vinci invented the first diving suit in 1462, and his initial designs were taken as inspiration for the development of these suits in the following years. The first documented dive was made on the Pisuerga River, in Valladolid, wearing an outfit designed by Jerónimo de Ayanz and Beaumont. Another design created by John Lethbridge in 1715 consisted of a barrel with a porthole in which the person locked himself up with arms sticking out, but could not be considered a suit.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

The first scuba with air from the surface, although that word did not exist at that time, was developed by the French Chevalier Pierre Rémy de Beauve. The suit that accompanied his invention was made of leather and kept the diver's body dry throughout the immersion. In the following years, many different models and designs were made to facilitate this activity. The French Sieur Fréminet designed the first metal helmet.

15. Construction of the Statue of Liberty

This neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island, formerly the island of Bedloe, is a colossal copper statue that was presented to the United States by the people of France. Its designer was the French sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, and the metal structure with which it was made is the work of Gustave Eiffel. This statue is a representation of the figure of Libertas, the Roman goddess of freedom, who carries a torch and a tabula. The tabula has the date of the Declaration of Independence of the United States engraved.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

Its construction was carried out in France, to be later disassembled and sent by ship to its final destination in New York. Because Viollet-le-Duc died without leaving instructions on how to continue the construction of the statue, Bartholdi hired Eiffel to take over the project. He and his structural engineer decided to discard part of the initial ideas and change the design to a less rigid structure. This change would allow the exterior of the structure not to bear any load, but to rest on an interior frame.

14. The practices of Apollo 1 in water

Apollo 1 was the first human-crewed mission of the program of the same name in the United States, a space program designed to take the first men to the Moon. Initially, it would be the first low Earth orbit test of the Apollo command and service module, which was to be launched in February 1967. The mission never managed to take off because an accidental fire in the cockpit during a launch test killed all three members of the crew.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

The command module was destroyed, claiming the life of command pilot Virgil I. "Gus" Grissom, senior pilot Ed White and Pilot Roger B. Chaffee. Among the training exercises they did, they used some pools designed by Nasa for training in zero gravity, as you can see in the image. The name Apollo, which was chosen by the crew, was made official by NASA in honor of them.

13. Bulletproof vest test

The bulletproof vest is an element of personal armor that helps absorb the impact of these projectiles and reduces or stops the penetration of the bullet. It is usually used on the person's torso and must withstand the effects of firearms, shrapnel from explosions, and any metal fragment at high speed. Soft vests are constructed using many layers of woven fibers and protect the person from low caliber shells. And hard garments usually have metal sheets embedded within the fabric.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

In the 1920s, the United States developed several types of body armor to protect its law enforcement officers and soldiers. One of them was the Brewster Body Shield, made of chromed nickel steel, but it weighed too much to be useful. A vest of steel scales superimposed on leather was also developed, which was considered more beneficial due to its weight and fit. The definitive test of these was done in people to determine the impact they felt when receiving a shot.

12. The Hindenburg on NYC

This was a large German commercial rigid aircraft that was listed as the leading ship of the Hinderburg class, the most extended category of flying machines. Designed and built by the Zeppelin Company (Luftschiffbau Zeppelin GmbH) in Friedrichshafen, and operated by the German airline company Zeppelin (Deutsche Zeppelin-Reederei). This ship managed to travel the world for 14 months, from March 1936, until its final flight in May 1937. A fire destroyed it at the end of its first transatlantic trip to North America of its second season.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

During his period of service, it made 17 round trips through the Atlantic, with ten visits to the United States and seven visits to Brazil. Its first trip across the North Atlantic left Frankfurt on May 6 with 56 crew and 50 passengers, arriving in Lakehurst on May 9. As it was a marvel to observes its route, the ship often overflew the main cities to attract the attention of the people. Its trips to the west took between 53 and 78 hours, and between 43 to 61 hours to the east.

11. Construction of Mount Rushmore

This sculpture carved into the granite face of Mount Rushmore in the Black Hills, Keystone, is one of the major national monuments of the United States. Gutzon Borglum was the sculptor who created the design and execution of this work from 1927 to 1941 with the help of his son. The sculpture represents the faces of 4 of the most outstanding presidents of the history of the country: George Washington (1732-1799), Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919) and Abraham Lincoln (1809-1865.) They were chosen because they represent the gradual evolution of the nation towards the country we know today.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

The construction of this monument was made from October 4, 1927, to October 31, 1941 thanks to the work of Borglum and 400 workers. Carving these faces implied the use of much dynamite, followed by a process known as "honeycomb" in which many holes were drilled together to remove small pieces of rock. Approximately 450,000 short tons of rock were removed from the mountainside to complete this sculpture.

10. Construction of the Hoover Dam

This gravity arch dam is located in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, on the border between the states of Nevada and Arizona, in the United States. It is one of the most impressive structures in that country and receives the visit of hundreds of people every year for being one of the main tourist attractions. Its construction began in 1931 and ended in 1936, during the Great Depression. Formerly known as Boulder Dam, it was a massive effort that required the efforts of thousands of workers and claimed the lives of more than 100 people.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

From about 1900 the feasibility of building a dam in the Black Canyon, and the nearby Boulder Canyon, began to be considered. The possibility of controlling floods, providing irrigation water, and producing electric power made Congress authorize the project in 1928. Never had such a large concrete structure been built, and several of the techniques used had not been previously tested. The climate and working conditions complicated its construction, but the company managed to deliver it to the federal government two years earlier than expected.

9. Invention to mitigate the effect of gravity on pilots

The G-force is a measure of a type of force per unit mass, such as acceleration, which causes us to feel a weight difference when we are in a value different from that of the Earth. Since these forces make us feel a variation in weight, some people describe it as "weight per unit mass." When a g-force is produced on the surface of one object resting on another, the reaction force builds an equal and opposed trust to counteract it.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

This clash of force alters the dynamics of the human body and can produce severe consequences. Air pilots support g-forces along the axis aligned to their columns, which causes a significant variation in the body's blood pressure. The changes can cause a person to blackout, lose consciousness, or even die. An ordinary person can withstand a force of around 5g0, but the development of inventions and special suits that force blood back to the brain helps support up to 9 g0.

8. Hitler's VW Bettle

This famous vehicle, officially known as the Volkswagen Type 1, and informally called by many other names in the world, is one of the most recognized car models worldwide. It is an economical car with two doors, rear-engine, and designed for five occupants, that was manufactured and sold by the German manufacturer Volkswagen from 1938 to 2003. The idea of ​​creating a popular car, its concept, and the purpose of this vehicle, was formulated by Adolf Hitler.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

The leader of Nazi Germany wanted a cheap and simple car that could be mass-produced, and that would occupy the country's new road network. Although members of the National Socialist party were promised the first production, the war necessities made them focus on military vehicles. Its design was delayed until 1938 by the engineer Ferdinand Porsche, but it is Béla Barényi who is credited with the original plan for Mercedes-Benz. The design had to be reviewed and approved by Hitler before starting its definitive production of 21,529,464 units.

7. Pablo Escobar and his son in the White House

This famous drug trafficker is recognized as one of the bloodiest in the history of Colombia, besides being the most powerful man in the world at some time. His power reached incredible levels, and he could travel everywhere without any concern, even to the United States. Escobar went on to earn up to $ 420 million in weekly sales without hiding too much.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

In 1981, Escobar began traveling to the United States to supervise his business and acquire properties on the country without being noticed. His son told that his father arrived in customs, showed his passport, and the government of the United States welcomed him. The day they decided to visit Washington, DC, they took this picture, like any tourist, and even made a guided tour of the FBI headquarters using a fake passport.

6. A circus hippopotamus

Circuses are companies of artists who organize themselves to give various entertainment shows, and which usually group clowns, acrobats, trained animals, trapeze acts, jugglers, magicians, and others. For many years animals have been included in this kind of acts, although they vary according to the circus. The big cats, camels, llamas, elephants, zebras, horses, donkeys, sea lions, bears, and monkeys are the most common, but in some cases, more strange animals were used.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

This particular image shows a circus hippopotamus named Lotus, who was trained to pull this vehicle by taking a short walk for the public's entertainment. They used a V-shaped tongue attached to a broad-band around the back of the animal that made traces unnecessary. Leather bridles with the reins tied to its jaw made the harness that was used to guide the "river horse" during his walk from his pond and back.

5. The youth of Bin Laden

Osama bin Laden was a Yemeni terrorist born in Saudi Arabia who is credited for the founding of the famous terrorist organization Al Qaeda. He was considered a Saudi until 1994, when he was expatriated, and traveled to many parts of the Middle East during the following years. One of the main reasons why he is known is because he was the mastermind behind the attacks of September 11, with a balance of almost 3,000 deaths.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

He was raised as a Sunni Muslim and attended the élite secular Al-Thager Model School. Records indicate that he studied economics and business administration at King Abdulaziz University, earning a degree in civil engineering or public administration at some point of his life. His primary interest in the university was religion, but he was also interested in poetry, reading, black stallions, and soccer, being a follower of the English club Arsenal.

4. The marriage of Joseph Goebbels

Goebbels was a Nazi politician very close to Hitler, in addition to being the propaganda minister of the Nazi Germany Reich for 12 years. He was not well known only for his friendship with the leader of Nazi Germany. His public speaking skills, as well as profoundly virulent anti-Semitism, was what he was famous for. Goebbels expressed his opinions against the Jews openly, and many considered him the person with the most extreme thinking of the Nazi party. At every opportunity, he advocated for more severe discrimination, including the extermination of Jews in the Holocaust.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

In 1930 he met Magda Quant, who had joined the party a few months before, and was quickly impressed with her. She worked as a volunteer at the party headquarters helping Goebbels to organize his private papers for a while. The couple married in 1931, with Hitler as their best man. It is said that their marriage was an arrangement because they needed a strong woman who could act as "the first lady of the Third Reich."

3. Queen Elizabeth II with a British rifle

Elizabeth II is Queen of the United Kingdom and other kingdoms of the Commonwealth. She was born in London as the first daughter of King George VI and Queen Elizabeth and was educated at home throughout her life. Her father, the Duke of York, ascended the throne after her brother, King Edward VIII, abdicated in 1936. She is currently married to Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, a former prince of Greece and Denmark, and they have four children together. She is known for being the monarch with the longest time on the throne, among other things.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

The Queen has a relationship with weapons because she was an active member of the armed forces of her country. In February 1945, she was appointed second honorary subaltern in the Auxiliary Territorial Service. She trained as a driver and mechanic and received the rank of minor honorary commander, which amounts to a female captain at that time. In the picture, you can see her firing a British L85 battle rifle in Surrey, England, during a 1993 visit to a training camp.

2. Old Halloween costumes

Halloween is a celebration that takes place on October 31, the eve of the Western Christian holiday of All Saints' Day, and can be seen today in many countries of the world. It is a date in which people honor and remember the dead, saints, martyrs, and faithful departed through different rituals, but which is also used as a source of entertainment and fun. It is believed that this festival comes from the ancient festivals of the Celtic harvest, particularly the festival of Samhain, which was later Christianized by the early church.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

​​​​Dressing up during this celebration is a tradition that goes back many years in the past, taking as reference the Celtic festivals of Samhain and Calan Gaeaf. It can also be a practice related to the representation of the souls of the Christian observance of Allhallowtide.
The costumes are mainly based on monsters or supernatural beings, but this has changed over the years. Today you can see general representations of famous characters from movies or television, as well as modified versions, to make them look more harmless, of terrifying costumes.

1. William Harley and Arthur Davidson

The history of this motorcycle company dated back to the early 1900s and was born as the idea of ​​William S. Harley and his childhood friend, Arthur Davidson. Harley started everything at age 20 when he began drawing plans for a small 166cc engine designed to be used in the frame of a pedal bike. For the next two years, they worked together on their motorcycle at a machine shop located in Milwaukee, at the home of their friend Henry Melk.

Image credits: Auto Overload

Image credits: Auto Overload

They managed to finish it in 1903 with the help of Arthur's brother, Walter Davidson, but they did not manage to make it work as they wished. They continued to work on an improved version with a much larger 405cc engine and a loop frame, similar to the one used by the Milwaukee Merkel motorcycle. That design took them away from the motorized bike category and set the path to future motorcycle designs. For this engine, they received help from the pioneer of the external motor, Ole Evinrude, and it was the first step towards the Harley-Davidson that we know today.

Bonus: Beautiful 'Auto-loving' girls

Pinterest

Pinterest

Pinterest

Pinterest

Sources: Auto Overload